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Hydro donates PCs to Oslo schools

February 2, 2005, 13:00 CET

Hydro signed an agreement with the City of Oslo's Education Authority on Wednesday that opens the doors of schools in the capital of Norway for receiving second-hand PCs from Hydro offices in the Oslo region. Under the PCs-for-schools agreement, schools in Oslo will receive several hundred PCs and peripheral equipment free of charge every year.

“We initiated the agreement after having learned through the media about the poor state of PCs used in schools,” says Trond Ellefsen of Oil & Energy.

The program established under this agreement benefits both parties:

“Schools will have better PCs and we streamline disposal of obsolete equipment. But the real point is that we enjoy seeing the equipment put to good use,” Ellefsen relates.

Under a similar agreement, Oil & Energy has furnished schools in Bergen, Norway’s second largest city, with second-hand equipment from offices and offshore installations for several years.

Hydro IS Partner, which manages PCs and computer solutions for Oil & Energy, will act as the middle-man in handing over donated equipment to schools — after erasing all stored data. The PCs will be distributed to schools in Oslo from a reception depot at Oslo’s Sogn senior high.

ICT students at Sogn will help get the donated equipment up and running, which makes this PC recycling agreement distinctive.

“Students get hands-on repair, distribution, and installation experience as part of their classwork,” explains Tore Kleppe Thomassen of Hydro IS Partner.

“We’re also looking into an IS Partner on-the-job program for students, so that they get experience with large, networked PC installations at a major company.”

Oil & Energy in Norway replaces up to 25 percent of its PCs every year. Most of the donated equipment is modern enough to suit the needs of schools and students.

“We replace PCs regularly to handle the complex and demanding systems in the oil and energy sector,” says Ellefsen.

The computers that are removed from service and donated to schools will meet specifications set by Oslo’s Education Authority. Thus, the city will not incur major expenditures to make the PCs operational.

The PCs-for-schools agreement allows additional Hydro units to join the program.

Under consideration are agreements to donate PC systems to the universities of Oslo and Bergen, both of which have expressed keen interest in acquiring Unix systems that will be retired from computationally-intensive disciplines at Hydro, such as geophysics, reservoir analysis, and offshore survey work.