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Northern Lights

Carbon capture and storage are to play a major role in the Norwegian climate solution. Equinor, Shell and TotalEnergies are investing in the Northern Lights project — Norway’s first licence for CO₂ storage on the NCS and a major part of the initiative that the Norwegian government calls Longship.

Illustration of Northern light scope: CO2 capture. Transport. Receiving terminal. Permanent storage.

Part of the "Longship" full-scale CCS project in Norway

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The Northern Lights project is part of the Norwegian full-scale CCS project called "Longship". The full-scale project includes capture of CO2 from industrial capture sources in the Oslofjord region (cement and waste-to-energy) and shipping of liquid CO2 from these industrial capture sites to an onshore terminal on the Norwegian west coast. From there, the liquified CO2 will be transported by pipeline to an offshore storage location subsea in the North Sea, for permanent storage.

Facts and figures

  • The Northern Lights project is part of the Norwegian full-scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) project. The full-scale project will include capture of CO2 from one or two industrial capture sources. The Northern Lights project comprises transportation, receipt and permanent storage of CO₂ in a reservoir in the northern North Sea.
  • Phase 1 includes capacity to transport, inject and store up to 1.5 million tonnes of CO2 per year. Once the CO2 is captured onshore, it will be transported by ship to the receiving terminal in Øygarden, pumped via pipeline to a subsea structure at the seabed and injected into a geological formation some 2,500 metres below the seabed in the North Sea for permanent storage.

Operation

The facilities are scheduled to be operational in 2024.

  • The CO2 receiving terminal will be located at the premises of Energiparken industrial area in the municipality of Øygarden in Western Norway.
  • The plant will be operated from Equinor’s facilities at the Sture terminal in Øygarden and the subsea facilities from Oseberg A platform in the North Sea.

Storage and location

  • Exploitation licence EL001 "Aurora" was awarded in January 2019.
  • Storage is located 2,500 metres below the seabed, south of the Troll field.
  • In March 2020 the Eos confirmation well was drilled. The well will be used for injection and storage of CO2.

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More on CCS in Equinor

Northern Lights background

The Northern Lights project is a result of the Norwegian government’s ambition to develop a full-scale CCS value chain in Norway by 2024.

As part of this ambition, the government issued feasibility studies on capture, transport and storage solutions in 2016. Combined, these studies confirmed the feasibility of realising a full-scale CCS project, and based on this outcome, the government decided to continue the development of the preferred concepts through a study agreement covering concept and FEED (front-end engineering and design) studies. Gassnova represents the Norwegian state and acts as the coordinating body.

Gassnova represents the Norwegian state and acts as the coordinating body. The studies cover:

  • Capture of CO2 at the waste-to-energy plant Fortum Oslo Varme in Oslo.
  • Capture of CO2 at the Norcem (Heidelberg Group) cement factory in Brevik.
  • The combined transport and storage solution, governed by the collaboration agreement between Equinor, Shell and TotalEnergies in the Northern Lights Project.

Gassnova website

Our climate ambitions – net-zero by 2050

Northern Lights CCS website